Emotional functioning of patients with neurofibromatosis tumor suppressor syndrome

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Emotional functioning of patients with neurofibromatosis tumor suppressor syndrome

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Title: Emotional functioning of patients with neurofibromatosis tumor suppressor syndrome
Author: Wang, Daphne L.; Smith, Kelly; Esparza, Sonia; Leigh, Fawn; Muzikansky, Alona; Park, Elyse Richelle; Plotkin, Scott Randall

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Citation: Wang, Daphne L., Kelly B. Smith, Sonia Esparza, Fawn A. Leigh, Alona Muzikansky, Elyse R. Park, and Scott R. Plotkin. 2012. “Emotional Functioning of Patients with Neurofibromatosis Tumor Suppressor Syndrome.” Genetics in Medicine 14 (12) (August 9): 977–982. doi:10.1038/gim.2012.85.
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Abstract: Purpose

Although patients with neurofibromatosis are predisposed to multiple nerve sheath tumors that can develop anywhere in the body and cause significant morbidity (e.g., hearing loss; pain), little research has examined emotional correlates of neurofibromatosis. The purpose of this study was to examine emotional functioning among adult patients with neurofibromatosis.

Methods

A total of 248 patients with neurofibromatosis (neurofibromatosis 1, neurofibromatosis 2, or schwannomatosis) who received care at a specialized clinic completed validated measures to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety, level of perceived stress, and self-esteem.

Results

Patients with neurofibromatosis reported significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety, higher levels of perceived stress, and lower levels of self-esteem as compared with general population norms. No significant differences were found among patients with neurofibromatosis 1, neurofibromatosis 2, and schwannomatosis, and emotional functioning was not significantly associated with disease severity. However, increased symptoms of depression and anxiety, higher levels of perceived stress, and lower levels of self-esteem were associated with a higher frequency of self-reported medical visits in the past year (P values ≤0.05).

Conclusion

Neurofibromatosis appears to be associated with reduced emotional functioning. Although further research is needed, these findings suggest a role for a multidisciplinary treatment approach to address emotional distress among adult patients with neurofibromatosis.
Published Version: 10.1038/gim.2012.85
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3982605/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32631197
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