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dc.contributor.authorEl-Jawahri, Areej Raed
dc.contributor.authorPodgurski, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorEichler, April Fitzsimmons
dc.contributor.authorPlotkin, Scott Randall
dc.contributor.authorTemel, Jennifer Sue
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Susan Lisa
dc.contributor.authorChang, Yu Chiao
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Michael John
dc.contributor.authorVolandes, Angelo
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-02T17:21:09Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2017-04-22T19:41:41-0400
dc.identifier.citationEl-Jawahri, Areej, Lisa M. Podgurski, April F. Eichler, Scott R. Plotkin, Jennifer S. Temel, Susan L. Mitchell, Yuchiao Chang, Michael J. Barry, and Angelo E. Volandes. 2010. “Use of Video to Facilitate End-of-Life Discussions With Patients With Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” Journal of Clinical Oncology 28 (2) (January 10): 305–310. doi:10.1200/jco.2009.24.7502.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-183Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32631208
dc.description.abstractPurpose To determine whether the use of a goals-of-care video to supplement a verbal description can improve end-of-life decision making for patients with cancer. Methods Fifty participants with malignant glioma were randomly assigned to either a verbal narrative of goals-of-care options at the end of life (control), or a video after the same verbal narrative (intervention) in this randomized controlled trial. The video depicts three levels of medical care: life-prolonging care (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR], ventilation), basic care (hospitalization, no CPR), and comfort care (symptom relief). The primary study outcome was participants' preferences for end-of-life care. The secondary outcome was participants' uncertainty regarding decision making (score range, 3 to 15; higher score indicating less uncertainty). Participants' comfort level with the video was also measured. Results Fifty participants were randomly assigned to either the verbal narrative (n = 27) or video (n = 23). After the verbal description, 25.9% of participants preferred life-prolonging care, 51.9% basic care, and 22.2% comfort care. In the video arm, no participants preferred life-prolonging care, 4.4% preferred basic care, 91.3% preferred comfort care, and 4.4% were uncertain (P < .0001). The mean uncertainty score was higher in the video group than in the verbal group (13.7 v 11.5, respectively; P < .002). In the intervention arm, 82.6% of participants reported being very comfortable watching the video. Conclusion Compared with participants who only heard a verbal description, participants who viewed a goals-of-care video were more likely to prefer comfort care and avoid CPR, and were more certain of their end-of-life decision making. Participants reported feeling comfortable watching the video.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)en_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1200/jco.2009.24.7502en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3040012/en_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleUse of Video to Facilitate End-of-Life Discussions With Patients With Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trialen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2017-04-22T23:41:29Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Clinical Oncologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorPlotkin, Scott Randall
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dc.date.available2010
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/jco.2009.24.7502*
workflow.legacycommentsPre-HMS policy and publisher requires policy to posten_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedVolandes, Angelo
dash.contributor.affiliatedBarry, Michael
dash.contributor.affiliatedEl-Jawahri, Areej
dash.contributor.affiliatedTemel, Jennifer
dash.contributor.affiliatedChang, Yuchiao
dash.contributor.affiliatedMitchell, Susan
dash.contributor.affiliatedEichler, April
dash.contributor.affiliatedPlotkin, Scott


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