Depression and Cost-Related Medication Nonadherence in Medicare Beneficiaries

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Depression and Cost-Related Medication Nonadherence in Medicare Beneficiaries

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Depression and Cost-Related Medication Nonadherence in Medicare Beneficiaries
Author: Bambauer, Kara Zivin; Safran, Dana Gelb; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Zhang, Fang; Adams, Alyce S.; Gurwitz, Jerry; Pierre-Jacques, Marsha; Soumerai, Stephen Bertram

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Bambauer, Kara Zivin, Dana Gelb Safran, Dennis Ross-Degnan, Fang Zhang, Alyce S. Adams, Jerry Gurwitz, Marsha Pierre-Jacques, and Stephen B. Soumerai. 2007. “Depression and Cost-Related Medication Nonadherence in Medicare Beneficiaries.” Archives of General Psychiatry 64 (5) (May 1): 602. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.64.5.602.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Context Treatment for depression can be expensive and depression can affect the use of other medical services, yet there is little information on how depression affects the prevalence of cost-related medication nonadherence (CRN) in elderly patients and patients with disabilities.

Objective To quantify the presence of CRN in depressed and nondepressed elderly Medicare beneficiaries and nonelderly Medicare beneficiaries with disabilities prior to the implementation of the Medicare Drug Benefit.

Design and Setting 2004 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey.

Participants Depressed and nondepressed elderly Medicare beneficiaries and beneficiaries with disabilities.

Main Outcome Measures Cost-related medication nonadherence included taking smaller doses or skipping doses of a prescription to make it last longer, or failing to fill a prescription because of cost, controlling for health insurance status, comorbid conditions, age, race, sex, and functional status.

Results In a nationally representative sample of 13 835 noninstitutionalized elderly Medicare enrollees and Medicare enrollees with disabilities, 44% of beneficiaries with disabilities and 13% of elderly beneficiaries reported being depressed during the previous year. Among enrollees with disabilities reporting depressive symptoms, 38% experienced CRN compared with 22% of enrollees with disabilities who did not report depressive symptoms. Among elderly enrollees who reported depressive symptoms, 19% experienced CRN, compared with 12% of elderly enrollees who did not report such symptoms. In adjusted analyses, depressive symptoms remained a significant predictor of CRN in both groups (persons with disabilities: odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.3; elderly persons: odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7).

Conclusions Depressive symptoms were associated with CRN in elderly Medicare enrollees and Medicare enrollees with disabilities. Providers should elicit information on economic barriers that might interfere with treatment of Medicare beneficiaries with depression.
Published Version: doi:10.1001/archpsyc.64.5.602
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32692213
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters