Effect of Pediatric Behavioral Health Screening and Colocated Services on Ambulatory and Inpatient Utilization

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Effect of Pediatric Behavioral Health Screening and Colocated Services on Ambulatory and Inpatient Utilization

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Title: Effect of Pediatric Behavioral Health Screening and Colocated Services on Ambulatory and Inpatient Utilization
Author: Hacker, Karen; Penfold, Robert B.; Arsenault, Lisa Nicole; Zhang, Fang; Soumerai, Stephen Bertram; Wissow, Lawrence S.

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Citation: Hacker, Karen A., Robert B. Penfold, Lisa N. Arsenault, Fang Zhang, Stephen B. Soumerai, and Lawrence S. Wissow. 2015. “Effect of Pediatric Behavioral Health Screening and Colocated Services on Ambulatory and Inpatient Utilization.” Psychiatric Services 66 (11) (November): 1141–1148. doi:10.1176/appi.ps.201400315.
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Abstract: Objective

The study sought to determine the impact of a pediatric behavioral health (BH) screening and co-location model on BH care utilization

Methods

In 2003, Cambridge Health Alliance, a Massachusetts public health system introduced BH screening and co-location of social workers within its pediatric practices in a sequential manner. An interrupted time series study of the change in trends of ambulatory, emergency and inpatient BH utilization in the 30 months following model implementation compared to the 18 months prior was conducted to determine the impact of this model on BH care utilization, Utilization data on 11,223 children ≥4 years 9 months to < 18 years 3 months seen from 2003 to 2008, contributed to the study.

Results

In the 30 months following implementation of pediatric BH screening and co-location there was a 20.4% cumulative increase in specialty BH visit rates (trend = 0.013% per month; p=0.049), and 67.7% cumulative increase in BH primary care visit rates (trend = 0.019% per month; p=0.002) compared to the expected rate predicted by the 18 month pre- intervention trend. In addition, BH emergency department visit rates increased 245% compared to the expected rate (trend = 0.01% per month; p<.001).

Conclusions

Following the implementation of a BH screening/co-location model, more children received BH treatment. Contrary to expectations, BH emergency department visits also increased. Further study is needed to determine if this is an effect of how care was organized for children newly engaged in BH care or a reflection of secular trends in BH utilization or both.
Published Version: doi:10.1176/appi.ps.201400315
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4633707/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:32696156
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