Neighborhoods and Violent Crime: A Multilevel Study of Collective Efficacy

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Neighborhoods and Violent Crime: A Multilevel Study of Collective Efficacy

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Neighborhoods and Violent Crime: A Multilevel Study of Collective Efficacy
Author: Sampson, Robert J.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Earls, Felton James

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Sampson, Robert J., Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Felton James Earls. 1997. “Neighborhoods and Violent Crime: A Multilevel Study of Collective Efficacy.” Science 277 (5328) (August 15): 918-924. doi:10.1126/science.277.5328.918.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: It is hypothesized that collective efficacy, defined as social cohesion among neighbors combined with their willingness to intervene on behalf of the common good, is linked to reduced violence. This hypothesis was tested on a 1995 survey of 8782 residents of 343 neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois. Multilevel analyses showed that a measure of collective efficacy yields a high between-neighborhood reliability and is negatively associated with variations in violence, when individual-level characteristics, measurement error, and prior violence are controlled. Associations of concentrated disadvantage and residential instability with violence are largely mediated by collective efficacy.
Published Version: doi:10.1126/science.277.5328.918
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33010407
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters