Conceptual distinctiveness supports detailed visual long-term memory for real-world objects

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Conceptual distinctiveness supports detailed visual long-term memory for real-world objects

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Conceptual distinctiveness supports detailed visual long-term memory for real-world objects
Author: Konkle, Talia A; Brady, Timothy F; Alvarez, George Angelo

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Konkle, Talia, Timothy F. Brady, and George A. Alvarez. 2010. "Conceptual Distinctiveness Supports Detailed Visual Long-Term Memory for Real-World Objects." Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139, no. 3: 558-578. doi: 10.1037/a0019165 .
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Humans have a massive capacity to store detailed information in visual long-term memory. The present studies explored the fidelity of these visual long-term memory representations and examined how conceptual and perceptual features of object categories support this capacity. Observers viewed 2,800 object images with a different number of exemplars presented from each category. At test, observers indicated which of 2 exemplars they had previously studied. Memory performance was high and remained quite high (82% accuracy) with 16 exemplars from a category in memory, demonstrating a large memory capacity for object exemplars. However, memory performance decreased as more exemplars were held in memory, implying systematic categorical interference. Object categories with conceptually distinctive exemplars showed less interference in memory as the number of exemplars increased. Interference in memory was not predicted by the perceptual distinctiveness of exemplars from an object category, though these perceptual measures predicted visual search rates for an object target among exemplars. These data provide evidence that observers' capacity to remember visual information in long-term memory depends more on conceptual structure than perceptual distinctiveness.
Published Version: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/xge/139/3/558/
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33010429
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters