Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) methylation and its association with clinical prognosis in patients with chondrosarcoma

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Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) methylation and its association with clinical prognosis in patients with chondrosarcoma

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Title: Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) methylation and its association with clinical prognosis in patients with chondrosarcoma
Author: Liu, Pei; Shen, Jacson K.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Liu, Fuyun; Duan, Zhenfeng

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Citation: Liu, Pei, Jacson K. Shen, Francis J. Hornicek, Fuyun Liu, and Zhenfeng Duan. 2017. “Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) methylation and its association with clinical prognosis in patients with chondrosarcoma.” Scientific Reports 7 (1): 1580. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-01763-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-01763-8.
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Abstract: Chondrosarcoma (CS) is a rare cancer, but it is the second most common primary malignant bone tumor and highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter CpG island of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) has been observed in different cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between WIF1 methylation and CS. In this study, we found promoter methylated WIF1 in both CS cell lines (CS-1 and SW1353) and tumor tissues. Western blot analysis confirmed loss WIF1 expression and activation of Wnt pathway proteins (Wnt5a/b, LRP6, and Dvl2). We subsequently examined the correlation between levels of WIF1 methylation and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in CS patient samples with a follow-up spanning 234 months (mean: 57.6 months). Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank tests revealed that high levels of WIF1 methylation were associated with lower OS and PFS rates (p < 0.05). Multivariate Cox hazard analysis suggested that detection of high level methylation of WIF1 could be an independent prognostic factor in OS and PFS. In conclusion, we found that WIF1 is epigenetically silenced via promoter DNA methylation in CS and propose that WIF1 methylation may serve as a potential prognostic marker for patients with CS.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/s41598-017-01763-8
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5431504/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33029911
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