Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Quality Indicators Are Similar Across HIV Care Delivery Models

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Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Quality Indicators Are Similar Across HIV Care Delivery Models

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Title: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Quality Indicators Are Similar Across HIV Care Delivery Models
Author: Rhodes, Corinne M.; Chang, Yuchiao; Regan, Susan; Singer, Daniel E.; Triant, Virginia A.

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Citation: Rhodes, Corinne M., Yuchiao Chang, Susan Regan, Daniel E. Singer, and Virginia A. Triant. 2017. “Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Quality Indicators Are Similar Across HIV Care Delivery Models.” Open Forum Infectious Diseases 4 (1): ofw240. doi:10.1093/ofid/ofw240. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofw240.
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Abstract: Abstract Background. There are limited data on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quality indicators according to model of HIV care delivery. Comparing HIV quality indicators by HIV care model could help inform best practices because patients achieving higher levels of quality indicators may have a mortality benefit. Methods. Using the Partners HIV Cohort, we categorized 1565 patients into 3 HIV care models: infectious disease provider only (ID), generalist only (generalist), or infectious disease provider and generalist (ID plus generalist). We examined 12 HIV quality indicators used by 5 major medical and quality associations and grouped them into 4 domains: process, screening, immunization, and HIV management. We used generalized estimating equations to account for most common provider and multivariable analyses adjusted for prespecified covariates to compare composite rates of HIV quality indicator completion. Results. We found significant differences between HIV care models, with the ID plus generalists group achieving significantly higher quality measures than the ID group in HIV management (94.4% vs 91.7%, P = .03) and higher quality measures than generalists in immunization (87.8% vs 80.6%, P = .03) in multivariable adjusted analyses. All models achieved rates that equaled or surpassed previously reported quality indicator rates. The absolute differences between groups were small and ranged from 2% to 7%. Conclusions. Our results suggest that multiple HIV care models are effective with respect to HIV quality metrics. Factors to consider when determining HIV care model include healthcare setting, feasibility, and physician and patient preference.
Published Version: doi:10.1093/ofid/ofw240
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5414087/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33030006
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