Understanding Ethnic Identity in Africa: Evidence from the Implicit Association Test (IAT)

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Understanding Ethnic Identity in Africa: Evidence from the Implicit Association Test (IAT)

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Understanding Ethnic Identity in Africa: Evidence from the Implicit Association Test (IAT)
Author: Lowes, Sara Rachel; Nunn, Nathan; Robinson, James A.; Weigel, Jonathan Lynn

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Lowes, Sara, Nathan Nunn, James A. Robinson, and Jonathan Weigel. 2015. Understanding Ethnic Identity in Africa: Evidence from the Implicit Association Test (IAT). American Economic Review 105, no. 5: 340–345. doi:10.1257/aer.p20151075.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: We use a variant of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to examine individuals’ implicit attitudes towards various ethnic groups. Using a population from the Democratic Republic of Congo, we find that the IAT measures show evidence of an implicit bias in favor of one’s own ethnicity. Individuals have implicit views of their own ethnic group that are more positive than their implicit views of other ethnic groups. We find this implicit bias to be quantitatively smaller than the (explicit) bias one finds when using self-reported attitudes about different ethnic groups.
Published Version: doi:http:10.1257/aer.p20151075
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33077827
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters