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dc.contributor.authorRyou, Marvin K.
dc.contributor.authorNemiroski, Alex
dc.contributor.authorAzagury, Dan
dc.contributor.authorShaikh, Sohail N.
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Michele B.
dc.contributor.authorWestervelt, Robert M.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Christopher C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-11T21:02:05Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationRyou, Marvin, Alex Nemiroski, Dan Azagury, Sohail N. Shaikh, Michele B. Ryan, Robert M. Westervelt, and Christopher C. Thompson. 2011. “An Implantable Wireless Biosensor for the Immediate Detection of Upper GI Bleeding: a New Fluorescein-Based Tool for Diagnosis and Surveillance (with Video).” Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 74 (1) (July): 189–194.e1. doi:10.1016/j.gie.2011.03.1182.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-5107en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33373340
dc.description.abstractBackground: Early recurrent hemorrhage after endoscopic intervention for acute upper GI bleeding (UGIB) can approach 20% and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Little has changed over the past several decades regarding immediate posthemorrhage surveillance, and there has likewise been no significant improvement in outcomes. Objective: To develop and test an endoscopically implantable wireless biosensor for real-time detection of fluorescein-labeled blood in ex vivo and in vivo porcine models of UGIB. Setting: Animal laboratory. Design: Benchtop and acute animal studies. Subjects: Five pigs. Interventions: UGIB models were surgically created in living pigs. Biosensors were endoscopically deployed in the stomach using standard endoscopic clips. The ability to detect acute UGIB and estimated blood loss leading to biosensor activation were recorded. Feasibility of wireless data transmission out of the body to an external computer and cell phone was assessed. Main Outcome Measurements: Technical feasibility and immediate complications. Results: A porcine UGIB model was successfully created. Biosensors were able to detect all acute bleeding events and wirelessly transmit out of the body, and successfully sent an emergency text message to the intended cell phone in all cases. Average estimated blood loss leading to biosensor activation was 30 mL (10 –75 mL). Limitations: Animal study; small numbers. Conclusions: An endoscopically implantable wireless biosensor successfully detected acute hemorrhage in a porcine UGIB model and sent an emergency cell-phone alert in real time.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEngineering and Applied Sciencesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1016/j.gie.2011.03.1182en_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleAn implantable wireless biosensor for the immediate detection of upper GI bleeding: a new fluorescein-based tool for diagnosis and surveillance (with video)en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalGastrointestinal Endoscopyen_US
dash.depositing.authorWestervelt, Robert M.
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gie.2011.03.1182*
workflow.legacycommentsWestervelt emailed 2016-05-10 AD Westervelt emailed 2017-03-09 MM meta.darken_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedRyou, Marvin
dash.contributor.affiliatedNemiroski, Alex
dash.contributor.affiliatedWestervelt, Robert


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