Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids
Author: Wankel, Scott D.; Germanovich, Leonid N.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Genc, Gence; DiPerna, Christopher J.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Olson, Eric J.; Girguis, Peter R.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Wankel, Scott D., Leonid N. Germanovich, Marvin D. Lilley, Gence Genc, Christopher J. DiPerna, Alexander S. Bradley, Eric J. Olson, and Peter R. Girguis. 2011. “Influence of Subsurface Biosphere on Geochemical Fluxes from Diffuse Hydrothermal Fluids.” Nature Geoscience 4 (7) (June 19): 461–468. doi:10.1038/ngeo1183.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Hydrothermal vents along mid-ocean systems host unique, highly productive biological communities, based on microbial chemoautotrophy, that thrive on the sulphur, metals, nitrogen and carbon emitted from the vents into the deep ocean. Geochemical studies of vents have centred on analyses of high-temperature, focused hydrothermal vents, which exhibit very high flow rates and are generally considered too hot for microbial life. Geochemical fluxes and metabolic activity associated with habitable, lower temperature diffuse fluids remain poorly constrained. As a result, little is known about the extent to which microbial communities, particularly in the subsurface, influence geochemical flux from more diffuse flows. Here, we estimate the net flux of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen from diffuse and focused hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca ridge, using an in situ mass spectrometer and flowmeter. We show that geochemical flux from diffuse vents can equal or exceed that emanating from hot, focused vents. Notably, hydrogen concentrations in fluids emerging from diffuse vents are 50% to 80% lower than predicted. We attribute the loss of hydrogen in diffuse vent fluids to microbial consumption in the subsurface, and suggest that subsurface microbial communities can significantly influence hydrothermal geochemical fluxes to the deep ocean.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/Ngeo1183
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33424109
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters