Wolves in Sheep's Clothing: SDO Asymmetrically Predicts Perceived Ethnic Victimization Among White and Latino Students Across Three Years

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Wolves in Sheep's Clothing: SDO Asymmetrically Predicts Perceived Ethnic Victimization Among White and Latino Students Across Three Years

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Title: Wolves in Sheep's Clothing: SDO Asymmetrically Predicts Perceived Ethnic Victimization Among White and Latino Students Across Three Years
Author: Thomsen, L; Green, E. G. T.; Ho, Arnold; Levin, S.; van Laar, C.; Sinclair, S.; Sidanius, James

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Citation: Thomsen, L., E. G. T. Green, A. K. Ho, S. Levin, C. van Laar, S. Sinclair, and J. Sidanius. 2009. “Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing: SDO Asymmetrically Predicts Perceived Ethnic Victimization Among White and Latino Students Across Three Years.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 36 (2) (December 16): 225–238. doi:10.1177/0146167209348617.
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Abstract: Dominant groups have claimed to be the targets of discrimination on several historical occasions during violent intergroup conflict and genocide. The authors argue that perceptions of ethnic victimization among members of dominant groups express social dominance motives and thus may be recruited for the enforcement of group hierarchy. They examine the antecedents of perceived ethnic victimization among dominants, following 561 college students over 3 years from freshman year to graduation year. Using longitudinal, cross-lagged structural equation modeling, the authors show that social dominance orientation (SDO) positively predicts perceived ethnic victimization among Whites but not among Latinos, whereas victimization does not predict SDO over time. In contrast, ethnic identity and victimization reciprocally predicted each other longitudinally with equal strength
among White and Latino students. SDO is not merely a reflection of contextualized social identity concerns but a psychological, relational motivation that undergirds intergroup attitudes across extended periods of time and interacts with the context of group dominance.
Published Version: doi:10.1177/0146167209348617
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33428540
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