Longitudinal trajectories and predictors of adolescent suicidal ideation and attempts following inpatient hospitalization.

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Longitudinal trajectories and predictors of adolescent suicidal ideation and attempts following inpatient hospitalization.

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Title: Longitudinal trajectories and predictors of adolescent suicidal ideation and attempts following inpatient hospitalization.
Author: Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Nock, Matthew K.; Simon, Valerie; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Cheah, Charissa S. L.; Spirito, Anthony

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Citation: Prinstein, Mitchell J., Matthew K. Nock, Valerie Simon, Julie Wargo Aikins, Charissa S. L. Cheah, and Anthony Spirito. 2008. “Longitudinal Trajectories and Predictors of Adolescent Suicidal Ideation and Attempts Following Inpatient Hospitalization.” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 76 (1): 92–103. doi:10.1037/0022-006x.76.1.92.
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Abstract: Remarkably little is known regarding the temporal course of adolescent suicidal ideation and behavior, the prediction of suicidal attempts from changes in suicidal ideation, or the prediction of suicidal attempts after accounting for suicidal ideation as a predictor. A sample of 143 adolescents 12–15 years old was assessed during psychiatric inpatient hospitalization and again at 3, 6, 9, 15, and 18 months postdischarge through a series of structured interviews and parent- and adolescent-reported instruments. Symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, externalizing psychopathology, hopelessness, and engagement in several forms of self-injurious/suicidal behaviors (i.e., suicide threats/gestures, plans, nonsuicidal self-injury [NSSI]) were assessed. Latent growth curve analyses revealed a period of suicidal ideation remission between baseline and 6 months following discharge, as well as a subtle period of suicidal ideation reemergence between 9 and 18 months postdischarge. Changes in suicidal ideation predicted suicide attempts. After accounting for the effects of suicidal ideation, baseline suicide threats/gestures also predicted future suicide attempts. Higher adolescent-reported depressive symptoms, lower parent-reported externalizing symptoms, and higher frequencies of NSSI predicted weaker suicidal ideation remission slopes. Findings underscore the need for more longitudinal research on the course of adolescent suicidality.
Published Version: doi:10.1037/0022-006X.76.1.92
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3703821/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33459450
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