The Blue Tip of the Stellar Locus: Measuring Reddening with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

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The Blue Tip of the Stellar Locus: Measuring Reddening with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

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Title: The Blue Tip of the Stellar Locus: Measuring Reddening with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey
Author: Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Schlegel, David J.; Juric, Mario; Ivezic, Zeljko; Gibson, Robert R.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

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Citation: Schlafly, Edward F., Douglas P. Finkbeiner, David J. Schlegel, Mario Juric, Zeljko Ivezic, Robert R. Gibson, Gillian R. Knapp, and Benjamin A. Weaver. 2010. “The Blue Tip of the Stellar Locus: Measuring Reddening with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.” The Astrophysical Journal 725 (1) (November 23): 1175–1191. doi:10.1088/0004-637x/725/1/1175.
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Abstract: We present measurements of reddening due to dust using the colors of stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the color of main-sequence turnoff stars by finding the "blue tip" of the stellar locus: the prominent blue edge in the distribution of stellar colors. The method is sensitive to color changes of order 18, 12, 7, and 8 mmag of reddening in the colors u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z, respectively, in regions measuring 90' by 14'. We present maps of the blue tip colors in each of these bands over the entire SDSS footprint, including the new dusty southern Galactic cap data provided by the SDSS-III. The results disfavor the best-fit O'Donnell and Cardelli et al. reddening laws, but are described well by a Fitzpatrick reddening law with RV = 3.1. The Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust map is found to trace the dust well, but overestimates reddening by factors of 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.4 in u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z largely due to the adopted reddening law. In select dusty regions of the sky, we find evidence for problems in the SFD temperature correction. A dust map normalization difference of 15% between the Galactic north and south sky may be due to these dust temperature errors.
Published Version: doi:10.1088/0004-637X/725/1/1175
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33461990
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