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dc.contributor.authorSiddig, Ahmed Ali
dc.contributor.authorEllison, Aaron M.
dc.contributor.authorMathewson, Brooks
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T18:43:38Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2017-05-04T11:55:36-0400
dc.identifier.citationSiddig, Ahmed A. H., Aaron M. Ellison, and Brooks G. Mathewson. 2016. “Assessing the Impacts of the Decline ofTsuga Canadensisstands on Two Amphibian Species in a New England Forest.” Ecosphere 7 (11) (November): e01574. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1574.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2150-8925en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33470134
dc.description.abstractDisturbances such as outbreaks of herbivorous insects and pathogens can devastate unique habitats and directly reduce biodiversity. The foundation tree species Tsuga canadensis (eastern hemlock) is declining due to infestation by the nonnative insect Adelges tsugae (hemlock woolly adelgid). The decline and expected elimination of hemlock from northeastern U.S. forests is changing forest structure, function, and assemblages of associated species. We assessed 10 years of changes in occupancy, detection probability, and relative abundance of two species of terrestrial salamanders, Plethodon cinereus (eastern red-back salamander) and Notopthalmus viridescens viridescens (eastern red-spotted newt), to the experimental removal in 2005 of T. canadensis at Harvard Forest. Salamanders were sampled under cover boards and using visual encounter surveys before (2004) and after (2005, 2013, 2014) canopy manipulations in replicate 0.81-ha plots. In 2004, occupancy of P. cinereus was 35% lower in stands dominated by T. canadensis than that in associated mixed-hardwood control stands, whereas detection probability and estimated abundance of P. cinereus were, respectively, 60% and 100% greater in T. canadensis stands. Estimated abundance of N. v. viridescens in 2004 was 50% higher in T. canadensis stands. Removal of the T. canadensis canopy increased occupancy of P. cinereus but significantly reduced its estimated detection probability and abundance. Estimated abundance of N. v. viridescens also declined dramatically after canopy manipulations. Our results suggest that ten years after T. canadensis loss due to either the adelgid or pre-emptive salvage logging, and 50–70 years later when these forests have become mid-successional mixed deciduous stands, the abundance of these salamanders likely will be <50% of their abundance in current, intact T. canadensis stands. This study adds to our understanding of how forest disturbance, directly and indirectly caused by invasive species, can contribute to declines in the relative abundance of amphibians.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOrganismic and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1002/ecs2.1574en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectabundanceen_US
dc.subjectAdelges tsugaeen_US
dc.subjectdetection probabilityen_US
dc.subjectHarvard Foresten_US
dc.subjectindicator speciesen_US
dc.subject47 monitoringen_US
dc.subjectNotophthalmus viridescensen_US
dc.subjectoccupancyen_US
dc.subjectPlethodon cinereusen_US
dc.subjectTsuga canadensisen_US
dc.titleAssessing the impacts of the decline of Tsuga canadensisstands on two amphibian species in a New England foresten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2017-05-04T15:55:21Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalEcosphereen_US
dash.depositing.authorEllison, Aaron M.
dc.date.available2016
dc.date.available2017-07-20T18:43:38Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ecs2.1574*
dash.contributor.affiliatedSiddig, Ahmed
dash.contributor.affiliatedMathewson, Brooks
dash.contributor.affiliatedEllison, Aaron
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4151-6081


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