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dc.contributor.authorTai, Amos P.K.
dc.contributor.authorMickley, Loretta J.
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Daniel James
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T18:29:25Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationTai, Amos P. K., Loretta J. Mickley, and Daniel James Jacob. 2010. “Correlations between Fine Particulate Matter \((PM_{2.5})\) and Meteorological Variables in the United States: Implications for the Sensitivity of \(PM_{2.5}\) to Climate Change.” Atmospheric Environment 44, no. 32: 3976–3984. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.06.060.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-6981en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33490488
dc.description.abstractWe applied a multiple linear regression (MLR) model to study the correlations of total \(PM_{2.5}\) and its components with meteorological variables using an 11-year (1998–2008) observational record over the contiguous US. The data were deseasonalized and detrended to focus on synoptic-scale correlations. We find that daily variation in meteorology as described by the MLR can explain up to 50% of \(PM_{2.5}\) variability with temperature, relative humidity (RH), precipitation, and circulation all being important predictors. Temperature is positively correlated with sulfate, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) almost everywhere. The correlation of nitrate with temperature is negative in the Southeast but positive in California and the Great Plains. RH is positively correlated with sulfate and nitrate, but negatively with OC and EC. Precipitation is strongly negatively correlated with all \(PM_{2.5}\) components. We find that \(PM_{2.5}\) concentrations are on average \(2.6 \mu g m^{−3}\) higher on stagnant vs. non-stagnant days. Our observed correlations provide a test for chemical transport models used to simulate the sensitivity of \(PM_{2.5}\) to climate change. They point to the importance of adequately representing the temperature dependence of agricultural, biogenic and wildfire emissions in these models.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEarth and Planetary Sciencesen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEngineering and Applied Sciencesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.06.060en_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectclimate changeen_US
dc.subjectmeteorologyen_US
dc.subjectmultiple linear regressionen_US
dc.subjectstagnationen_US
dc.subject\(PM_{2.5}\)en_US
dc.titleCorrelations between Fine Particulate Matter \((PM_{2.5})\) and Meteorological Variables in the United States: Implications for the Sensitivity of \(PM_{2.5}\) to Climate Changeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalAtmospheric Environmenten_US
dash.depositing.authorJacob, Daniel James
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.06.060*
workflow.legacycommentsFAR - pulled from Jacob's website per his instructions Jacob emailed 2016-05-15 MM Jacob emailed 2017-02-25 MM meta.darken_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedMickley, Loretta
dash.contributor.affiliatedJacob, Daniel


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