Obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate decreased activation of reward-related brain centers in response to food cues in both the fed and fasting states: A preliminary fMRI study

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Obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate decreased activation of reward-related brain centers in response to food cues in both the fed and fasting states: A preliminary fMRI study

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Title: Obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate decreased activation of reward-related brain centers in response to food cues in both the fed and fasting states: A preliminary fMRI study
Author: Farr, Olivia M.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

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Citation: Farr, Olivia M., and Christos S. Mantzoros. 2016. “Obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate decreased activation of reward-related brain centers in response to food cues in both the fed and fasting states: A preliminary fMRI study.” International journal of obesity (2005) 41 (3): 471-474. doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.231. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2016.231.
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Abstract: It remains unknown whether obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate altered activation of brain centers in response to food cues. We examined obese prediabetics (n=26) vs. obese nondiabetics (n=11) using fMRI. We also performed regression analyses on the basis of the number of MetS components per subject. Obese individuals with prediabetes have decreased activation of the reward-related putamen in the fasting state and decreased activation of the salience- and reward-related insula after eating. Obese individuals with more components of MetS demonstrate decreased activation of the putamen while fasting. All these activations remain significant when corrected for BMI, waist circumference (WC), HbA1c and gender. Decreased activation in reward-related brain areas between obese individuals is more pronounced in subjects with prediabetes and MetS. Prospective studies are needed to quantify their contributions to the development of prediabetes/MetS and to study whether these conditions may predispose to the exacerbation of obesity and the development of comorbidities over time.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.231
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5340581/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33490813
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