Clinical Features and Sleep Analysis of Chinese Patients with Fatal Familial Insomnia

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Clinical Features and Sleep Analysis of Chinese Patients with Fatal Familial Insomnia

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Title: Clinical Features and Sleep Analysis of Chinese Patients with Fatal Familial Insomnia
Author: Wu, Liyong; Lu, Hui; Wang, Xianling; Liu, Jia; Huang, Chaoyang; Ye, Jing; Li, Cuijiang; Lu, Jun; Wang, Yuping; Jia, Jianping; Zhan, Shuqin

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Citation: Wu, L., H. Lu, X. Wang, J. Liu, C. Huang, J. Ye, C. Li, et al. 2017. “Clinical Features and Sleep Analysis of Chinese Patients with Fatal Familial Insomnia.” Scientific Reports 7 (1): 3625. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-03817-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03817-3.
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Abstract: This study aimed to examine clinical features, sleep, abnormal sleep-wake transition and non-sleep disturbances as well as lab tests in Chinese fatal familial insomnia (FFI) subjects. Patients with confirmed clinical and laboratory diagnosis of FFI have been retrospectively reviewed. The clinical features and the results of the complementary tests, including polysomnography (PSG), brain imaging and genetic analysis, were used. Two male and three female patients were recruited in this study. Three of the five patients had more comprehensive family medical records. The most typical clinical manifestations in all 5 patients were sleep disturbances, including insomnia, laryngeal stridor, sleep breath disturbance, and sleep-related involuntary movements. PSG of all these five cases showed reduction in total sleep time, sleep fragmentation, abnormal short non-rapid eye movement - rapid eye movement (REM) cycling, REM sleep reduction or loss, and REM sleep instruction in wakefulness. Patient 2's emission tomography scan demonstrated a reduction in glucose uptake in the left thalamus and bilateral inferior parietal lobe. In summary, Chinese FFI patients are typically characterized by organic sleep related symptoms, rapidly progressive dementia and sympathetic symptoms. We propose that structural damages in the thalamus and cortex are mostly responsible for clinical manifestations of FFI.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/s41598-017-03817-3
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5472586/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33490845
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