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dc.contributor.advisorKhwaja, Asimen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAlesina, Albertoen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunn, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPomeranz, Dinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorOkunogbe, Oyebola Motunrayoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T14:43:15Z
dash.embargo.terms2018-05-01en_US
dc.date.created2016-05en_US
dc.date.issued2016-05-17en_US
dc.date.submitted2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationOkunogbe, Oyebola Motunrayo. 2016. Essays in Political Economy and Development. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33493524
dc.description.abstractChapter 1 examines the impact of interethnic exposure on national integration in a multiethnic state. It uses variation arising from a mandatory program in Nigeria that randomly posted university graduates to different states of the country for a year of national service. I administer a survey to a cohort of university alumni seven years after their participation and compare participants who served in a state where they are the ethnic majority to those exposed to a state where they are not the majority. The results indicate two concurrent effects: interethnic exposure creates a stronger connection to the country while also reinforcing participants' connection to their ethnic group. In Chapter 2, using data from Nigeria, I provide descriptive evidence on how the prevalence of spousal violence varies with status differences (as reflected in age, education and income) and ethnic and religious differences among couples. I document that women who are older, more educated or earn more money than their spouses experience more violence consistent with the backlash hypothesis in sociology. I also show that marriages with partners of the same religion have less violence consistent with socialization theories but this effect is not significant for ethnically endogamous marriages. Lastly, I explore potential reasons for the coexistence of domestic violence and indicators of women’s empowerment in households. Chapter 3 is part of a broader project that studies the impact of technology on service delivery and corruption. We examine the decisions of firms to adopt electronic tax filing (e-filing) in Tajikistan. E-filing allows taxpayers to submit their tax declarations online thereby reducing travel time to the tax office and direct interactions with tax officials. Using a randomized experiment, we find that e-filing training coupled with logistical help with registration (but not training alone) is highly successful at promoting e-filing adoption. Further, we find suggestive evidence that firms that report prior extortion from tax officials are more likely to adopt whereas those with greater likelihood of evading taxes are less likely to adopt.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPublic Policyen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Generalen_US
dc.titleEssays in Political Economy and Developmenten_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dash.depositing.authorOkunogbe, Oyebola Motunrayoen_US
dc.date.available2018-05-01T07:31:02Z
thesis.degree.date2016en_US
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
thesis.degree.departmentPublic Policyen_US
dash.identifier.vireohttp://etds.lib.harvard.edu/gsas/admin/view/911en_US
dc.description.keywordsPolitical Economy; Economic Development; Nation Building; Intergroup Relations; Multiethnic State; Domestic Violence; Tax Administration; Corruptionen_US
dash.author.emailoyebola.okunogbe@gmail.comen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedOkunogbe, Oyebola Motunrayo


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