Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKronauer, Daniel J. C.
dc.contributor.authorPierce, Naomi Ellen
dc.contributor.authorKeller, Laurent
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-03T17:42:17Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationKronauer, Daniel J. C., Naomi E. Pierce, and Laurent Keller. 2012. “Asexual Reproduction in Introduced and Native Populations of the antCerapachys Biroi.” Molecular Ecology 21 (21) (September 26): 5221–5235. doi:10.1111/mec.12041.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-294Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33703662
dc.description.abstractAsexual reproduction is particularly common among introduced species, probably because it helps to overcome the negative effects associated with low population densities during colonization. The ant Cerapachys biroi has been introduced to tropical and subtropical islands around the world since the beginning of the last century. In this species, workers can reproduce via thelytokous parthenogenesis. Here, we use genetic markers to reconstruct the history of anthropogenic introductions of C. biroi, and to address the prevalence of female parthenogenesis in introduced and native populations. We show that at least four genetically distinct lineages have been introduced from continental Asia and have led to the species' circumtropical establishment. Our analyses demonstrate that asexual reproduction dominates in the introduced range and is also common in the native range. Given that C. biroi is the only dorylomorph ant that has successfully become established outside of its native range, this unusual mode of reproduction probably facilitated the species' worldwide spread. On the other hand, the rare occurrence of haploid males and at least one clear case of sexual recombination in the introduced range show that C. biroi has not lost the potential for sex. Finally, we show that thelytoky in C. biroi probably has a genetic rather than an infectious origin, and that automixis with central fusion is the most likely underlying cytological mechanism. This is in accordance with what is known for other thelytokous eusocial Hymenoptera.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOrganismic and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1111/mec.12041en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.oeb.harvard.edu/faculty/pierce/publications/pdfs/2012_Kronauer_et_al_Asexual_Reproduction.pdfen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectanthropogenic introductionen_US
dc.subjectasexualityen_US
dc.subjectautomixisen_US
dc.subjectFormicidaeen_US
dc.subjectparthenogenesisen_US
dc.subjectthelytokyen_US
dc.titleAsexual reproduction in introduced and native populations of the antCerapachys biroien_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalMolecular Ecologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorPierce, Naomi Ellen
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.12041*
workflow.legacycommentsFAR 2013 Pierce emailed 2016-04-24 MM Pierce emailed 2017-02-24 MM meta.darken_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedPierce, Naomi


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record