Epithelial Progeny of Estrogen-Exposed Breast Progenitor Cells Display a Cancer-like Methylome

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Epithelial Progeny of Estrogen-Exposed Breast Progenitor Cells Display a Cancer-like Methylome

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Title: Epithelial Progeny of Estrogen-Exposed Breast Progenitor Cells Display a Cancer-like Methylome
Author: Cheng, A. S.L.; Culhane, Aedin; Chan, M. W.Y.; Venkataramu, C. R.; Ehrich, M.; Nasir, A.; Rodriguez, B. A.T.; Liu, J.; Yan, P. S.; Quackenbush, John; Nephew, K. P.; Yeatman, T. J.; Huang, T. H-M.

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Citation: Cheng, A. S.L., A. C. Culhane, M. W.Y. Chan, C. R. Venkataramu, M. Ehrich, A. Nasir, B. A.T. Rodriguez, et al. 2008. “Epithelial Progeny of Estrogen-Exposed Breast Progenitor Cells Display a Cancer-Like Methylome.” Cancer Research 68 (6) (March 15): 1786–1796. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.can-07-5547.
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Abstract: Estrogen imprinting is used to describe a phenomenon in which early developmental exposure to endocrine disruptors increases breast cancer risk later in adult life. We propose that long-lived, self-regenerating stem and progenitor cells are more susceptible to the exposure injury than terminally differentiated epithelial cells in the breast duct. Mammospheres, containing enriched breast progenitors, were used as an exposure system to simulate this imprinting phenomenon in vitro. Using MeDIP-chip, a methylation microarray screening method, we found that 0.5% (120 loci) of human CpG islands were hypermethylated in epithelial cells derived from estrogenexposed progenitors compared with the non–estrogen-exposed control cells. This epigenetic event may lead to progressive silencing of tumor suppressor genes, including RUNX3, in these epithelial cells, which also occurred in primary breast tumors. Furthermore, normal tissue in close proximity to the tumor site also displayed RUNX3 hypermethylation, suggesting that this aberrant event occurs in early breast carcinogenesis. The high prevalence of estrogen-induced epigenetic changes in primary tumors and the surrounding histologically normal tissues provides the first empirical link between estrogen injury of breast stem/progenitor cells and carcinogenesis. This finding also offers a mechanistic explanation as to why a tumor suppressor gene, such as RUNX3, can be heritably silenced by epigenetic mechanisms in breast cancer.
Published Version: doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-5547
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33747040
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