Effect of Preterm Birth on Postnatal Apolipoprotein and Adipocytokine Profiles

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Effect of Preterm Birth on Postnatal Apolipoprotein and Adipocytokine Profiles

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Title: Effect of Preterm Birth on Postnatal Apolipoprotein and Adipocytokine Profiles
Author: Hellgren, Gunnel; Engstrom, Eva; Smith, Lois Elaine Hodgson; Löfqvist, Chatarina; Hellström, Ann

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Citation: Hellgren, Gunnel, Eva Engström, Lois E. Smith, Chatarina Löfqvist, and Ann Hellström. 2015. Effect of Preterm Birth on Postnatal Apolipoprotein and Adipocytokine Profiles. Neonatology 108, no. 1: 16–22. doi:10.1159/000381278.
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Abstract: BACKGROUND: Critical metabolic changes preparing for ex utero life may occur at the fetal age of approximately 28-32 weeks, and preterm birth <28 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) may affect these pathways. Children born <28 weeks often have poorer outcomes possibly due to a major shift in metabolism, including nutritional supply and a shift in lipid-transporting particles and lipid profile. This shift may occur in apolipoprotein and adipocytokine levels, which may influence metabolism. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a shift in apolipoprotein and adipocytokine levels in neonates born at a gestational age (GA) of 28 and 32 weeks, respectively. METHODS: Blood samples from 47 infants (GA 32 weeks, n = 30 and GA 28 weeks, n = 17) were collected at birth and, in the GA28 group, also at PMA 32 weeks. Apolipoproteins A-1, A-2, B, C-2, C-3, and E were analyzed, as well as adiponectin and leptin levels. RESULTS: Serum levels of apolipoproteins A-1, C-2, C-3, and E were lower at birth in the GA28 group compared to the GA32 group. Adiponectin and leptin levels were low at birth in the GA28 group. In the GA28 group 4 weeks after birth, leptin levels were still low, whereas adiponectin levels had increased to levels similar to those found at birth in the GA32 group. Apolipoprotein A-1, C-2, C-3, and E levels were negatively correlated with days receiving total parenteral nutrition. CONCLUSION: There are significant differences in apolipoprotein and adipocytokine levels, which can be associated with GA and birth weight. The impact of these changes on neonatal and future morbidity remains to be determined.
Published Version: doi:10.1159/000381278
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33776186
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