Understanding the Impact of Acute Stressor During Simulation on Medical Students' Short and Long-Term Clinical Skills Retention

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Understanding the Impact of Acute Stressor During Simulation on Medical Students' Short and Long-Term Clinical Skills Retention

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Title: Understanding the Impact of Acute Stressor During Simulation on Medical Students' Short and Long-Term Clinical Skills Retention
Author: Hasdianda, Mohammad Adrian ORCID  0000-0002-3100-9660
Citation: Hasdianda, Mohammad Adrian. 2016. Understanding the Impact of Acute Stressor During Simulation on Medical Students' Short and Long-Term Clinical Skills Retention. Master's thesis, Harvard Medical School.
Access Status: This work is under embargo until 2018-05-01
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Abstract: Background:

Acute stressors may be beneficial when embedded in simulation scenario to promote better skills retention. We aimed to establish the impact of acute stressors to medical students’ short-and long-term retention of intravenous catheterization skills.

Methods:

Forty-five participants took part in the intravenous catheterization simulation using standardized patients in treatment (Stress) and control (Non-Stress) groups. Participants were asked to complete State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and assessed on their skills performance before, shortly after and twenty days after the simulation session. We continuously recorded participants’ heart rate during the simulation.

Results:

No significant difference and interaction were found between pre-simulation, short-term, and long-term skills performance scores for both groups F(2, 84) = 1.231, p = 0.297. Analysis of average and maximum heart rate as well as anxiety scores was not statistically different between groups.

Conclusion:

Future study is needed to gain insight into sufficient amount of stressors needed to impact medical students’ skills retention.
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33840764
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