Orthographic Distinctiveness and Semantic Elaboration Provide Separate Contributions to Memory

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Orthographic Distinctiveness and Semantic Elaboration Provide Separate Contributions to Memory

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Title: Orthographic Distinctiveness and Semantic Elaboration Provide Separate Contributions to Memory
Author: Kirchhoff, Brenda A.; Schapiro, Melissa L.; Buckner, Randy Lee

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Kirchhoff, Brenda A., Melissa L. Schapiro, and Randy L. Buckner. 2005. “Orthographic Distinctiveness and Semantic Elaboration Provide Separate Contributions to Memory.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 17 (12) (December): 1841–1854. doi:10.1162/089892905775008670.
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Abstract: Orthographic distinctiveness and semantic elaboration both enhance memory. The present behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies examined the relationship between the influences of orthographic distinctiveness and semantic elaboration on memory, and explored whether they make independent contributions. As is typical for manipulations of processing levels, words studied during semantic encoding were better remembered than words studied during nonsemantic encoding. Notably, orthographically distinct words were better recalled and received more remember responses on recognition memory tests than orthographically common words regardless of encoding task, suggesting that orthographic distinctiveness has an additive effect to that of semantic elaboration on memory. In the fMRI study, ortho-graphic distinctiveness and semantic elaboration engaged separate networks of brain regions. Semantic elaboration modulated activity in left inferior prefrontal and lateral temporal regions. In contrast, orthographic distinctiveness modulated activity in distinct bilateral inferior prefrontal, extrastriate, and parietal regions. Orthographic distinctiveness and semantic elaboration appear to have separate behavioral and functional-anatomic contributions to memory.
Published Version: doi:10.1162/089892905775008670
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33896766
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