Set-and Code-Specific Activation in the Frontal Cortex: An fMRI Study of Encoding and Retrieval of Faces and Words

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Set-and Code-Specific Activation in the Frontal Cortex: An fMRI Study of Encoding and Retrieval of Faces and Words

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Set-and Code-Specific Activation in the Frontal Cortex: An fMRI Study of Encoding and Retrieval of Faces and Words
Author: McDermott, Kathleen A.; Buckner, Randy Lee; Petersen, Steven E.; Kelley, William M.; Sanders, Amy L.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: McDermott, Kathleen B., Randy L. Buckner, Steven E. Petersen, William M. Kelley, and Amy L. Sanders. 1999. “Set-and Code-Specific Activation in the Frontal Cortex: An fMRI Study of Encoding and Retrieval of Faces and Words.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 11 (6) (November): 631–640. doi:10.1162/089892999563698.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: The frontal cortex has been described as playing both “setspecific” and “code-specific” roles in human memory processing. Set specificity refers to the finding of goal-oriented differences in activation patterns (e.g., encoding relative to retrieval). Code specificity refers to the finding of different patterns of activation for different types of stimuli (e.g., verbal/nonverbal). Using a two (code: verbal, nonverbal) by two (set: encoding, retrieval) within-subjects design and fMRI, we explored the influence of type of code and mental set in two regions in the frontal cortex that have been previously shown to be involved in memory. A region in the dorsal extent of the inferior frontal gyrus (BA 6/44) demonstrated code-specific effects. Specifically, an interaction of material type with hemisphere was obtained, such that words produced predominantly left-lateralized activation, whereas unfamiliar faces elicited predominantly right-lateralized activation. A region of the right frontal polar cortex (in or near BA 10), which has been activated in many memory retrieval studies, showed set-specific activation in that it was more active during retrieval than encoding. These data demonstrate that distinct regions in the frontal cortex contribute in systematic yet different ways to human memory processing.
Published Version: doi:10.1162/089892999563698
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:33896769
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters