Many ways to die, one way to arrive: how selection acts through pregnancy

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Many ways to die, one way to arrive: how selection acts through pregnancy

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Title: Many ways to die, one way to arrive: how selection acts through pregnancy
Author: Brown, Elizabeth Anne; Ruvolo, Maryellen; Sabeti, Pardis Christine

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Brown, Elizabeth A., Maryellen Ruvolo, and Pardis C. Sabeti. 2013. “Many Ways to Die, One Way to Arrive: How Selection Acts through Pregnancy.” Trends in Genetics 29 (10) (October): 585–592. doi:10.1016/j.tig.2013.03.001.
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Abstract: When considering selective forces shaping human evolution, the importance of pregnancy to fitness should not be underestimated. Although specific mortality factors may only impact upon a fraction of the population, birth is a funnel through which all individuals must pass. Human pregnancy places exceptional energetic, physical, and immunological demands on the mother to accommodate the needs of the fetus, making the woman more vulnerable during this time-period. Here, we examine how metabolic imbalances, infectious diseases, oxygen deficiency, and nutrient levels in pregnancy can exert selective pressures on women and their unborn offspring. Numerous candidate genes under selection are being revealed by next-generation sequencing, providing the opportunity to study further the relationship between selection and pregnancy. This relationship is important to consider to gain insight into recent human adaptations to unique diets and environments worldwide.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.tig.2013.03.001
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34298867
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