Effects of emotionally valenced working memory taxation on negative memories

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Effects of emotionally valenced working memory taxation on negative memories

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Effects of emotionally valenced working memory taxation on negative memories
Author: Tsai, Cynthia; McNally, Richard J.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Tsai, Cynthia, and Richard J. McNally. 2014. “Effects of Emotionally Valenced Working Memory Taxation on Negative Memories.” Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry 45 (1) (March): 15–19. doi:10.1016/j.jbtep.2013.07.004.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background and objectives: Memories enter a labile state during recollection. Thus, memory changes that occur during recollection can affect future instances of its activation. Having subjects perform a secondary task that taxes working memory while they recall a negative emotional memory often reduces its vividness and emotional intensity during subsequent recollections. However, researchers have not manipulated the emotional valence of the secondary task itself. Methods: Subjects viewed a video depicting the aftermath of three fatal road traffic accidents, establishing the same negative emotional memory for all subjects. We then tested their memory for the video after randomly assigning them to no secondary task or a delayed match-to-sample secondary task involving photographs of positive, negative, or neutral emotional valence. Results: The positive secondary task reduced memory for details about the video, whereas negative and neutral tasks did not. Limitations: We did not assess the vividness and emotionality of the subjects’ memory of the video. Conclusions: Having subjects recall a stressful experience while performing a positively valent secondary task can decrement details of the memory and perhaps its emotionality.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.jbtep.2013.07.004
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34310815
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters