Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women’s Ice Hockey Athletes

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Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women’s Ice Hockey Athletes

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Title: Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women’s Ice Hockey Athletes
Author: Brook, Emily M.; Kroshus, Emily; Hu, Caroline H.; Gedman, Marissa; Collins, Jamie E.; Matzkin, Elizabeth G.

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Citation: Brook, Emily M., Emily Kroshus, Caroline H. Hu, Marissa Gedman, Jamie E. Collins, and Elizabeth G. Matzkin. 2017. “Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women’s Ice Hockey Athletes.” Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine 5 (7): 2325967117714445. doi:10.1177/2325967117714445. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967117714445.
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Abstract: Background: There are limited data on the incidence of concussion and concussion symptom nondisclosure among collegiate women’s ice hockey athletes. Purpose: To determine the incidence of sports-related concussion (SRC) in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women’s ice hockey athletes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: An anonymous online survey was completed by 459 NCAA women’s ice hockey athletes. Players reported diagnosed concussions as well as incidents where they experienced an impact or blow to the head followed by symptoms associated with a concussion; reports spanned the duration of the 2014-2015 season and throughout players’ organized hockey career. Results: About half (n = 219, 47.7%) of respondents reported at least 1 diagnosed concussion over the duration of their entire organized ice hockey career. A total of 13.3% (n = 61) of respondents reported a diagnosed concussion during the 2014-2015 season. The incidence rate was 1.18 (95% CI, 0.92-1.51) per 1000 athlete-exposures to a game or practice and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.45-0.74) per 1000 hours of ice time. One-third (34.2%, n = 157) of players reported at least 1 impact where they experienced concussion-like symptoms during the 2014-2015 season; 82.8% of these players reported that they continued to play after at least 1 of these impacts, and 66.8% of players reported at least 1 impact where they never disclosed any symptoms. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of SRC in collegiate women’s ice hockey and a concerning level of symptom nondisclosure. Additional research is needed to understand the causes of concussion and reasons for the lack of symptom disclosure, including factors specific to female athletes and contextual issues specific to women’s collegiate ice hockey.
Published Version: doi:10.1177/2325967117714445
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5528947/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34375093
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