Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania
Author: Locks, Lindsey M.; Mwiru, Ramadhani S.; Mtisi, Expeditho; Manji, Karim P.; McDonald, Christine M.; Liu, Enju; Kupka, Roland; Kisenge, Rodrick; Aboud, Said; Gosselin, Kerri; Gillman, Matthew; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.; Duggan, Christopher P.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Locks, L. M., R. S. Mwiru, E. Mtisi, K. P. Manji, C. M. McDonald, E. Liu, R. Kupka, et al. 2017. “Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania.” The Journal of Pediatrics 187 (1): 225-233.e1. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.04.005. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.04.005.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Objective: To assess whether growth and biomarkers of environmental enteric dysfunction in infancy are related to health outcomes in midchildhood in Tanzania. Study design Children who participated in 2 randomized trials of micronutrient supplements in infancy were followed up in midchildhood (4.6-9.8 years of age). Anthropometry was measured at age 6 and 52 weeks in both trials, and blood samples were available from children at 6 weeks and 6 months from 1 trial. Linear regression was used for height-for-age z-score, body mass index-for-age z-score, and weight for age z-score, and blood pressure analyses; log-binomial models were used to estimate risk of overweight, obesity, and stunting in midchildhood. Results: One hundred thirteen children were followed-up. Length-for-age z-score at 6 weeks and delta length-for-age z-score from 6 to 52 weeks were associated independently and positively with height-for-age z-score and inversely associated with stunting in midchildhood. Delta weight-for-length and weight-for-age z-score were also positively associated with midchildhood height-for-age z-score. The 6-week and delta weight-for-length z-scores were associated independently and positively with midchildhood body mass index-for-age z-score and overweight, as was the 6-week and delta weight-for-age z-score. Delta length-for-age z-score was also associated with an increased risk of overweight in midchildhood. Body mass index-for-age z-score in midchildhood was associated positively with systolic blood pressure. Serum anti-flagellin IgA concentration at 6 weeks was also associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Conclusions: Anthropometry at 6 weeks and growth in infancy independently predict size in midchildhood, while anti-flagellin IgA, a biomarker of environmental enteric dysfunction, in early infancy is associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Interventions in early life should focus on optimizing linear growth while minimizing excess weight gain and environmental enteric dysfunction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00197730 and NCT00421668.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.04.005
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5533170/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34375265
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters