Does Implementation Follow Design? A Case Study of a Workplace Health Promotion Program Using the 4-S Program Design and the PIPE Impact Metric Evaluation Models

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Does Implementation Follow Design? A Case Study of a Workplace Health Promotion Program Using the 4-S Program Design and the PIPE Impact Metric Evaluation Models

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Title: Does Implementation Follow Design? A Case Study of a Workplace Health Promotion Program Using the 4-S Program Design and the PIPE Impact Metric Evaluation Models
Author: Äikäs, Antti Hermanni; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Hirvensalo, Mirja Hannele; Absetz, Pilvikki

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Citation: Äikäs, Antti Hermanni, Nicolaas P. Pronk, Mirja Hannele Hirvensalo, and Pilvikki Absetz. 2017. “Does Implementation Follow Design? A Case Study of a Workplace Health Promotion Program Using the 4-S Program Design and the PIPE Impact Metric Evaluation Models.” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 59 (8): 752-760. doi:10.1097/JOM.0000000000001067. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001067.
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Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the content of a multiyear market-based workplace health promotion (WHP) program and to evaluate design and implementation processes in a real-world setting. Methods: Data was collected from the databases of the employer and the service provider. It was classified using the 4-S (Size, Scope, Scalability, and Sustainability) and PIPE Impact Metric (Penetration, Implementation) models. Data analysis utilized both qualitative and quantitative methods. Results: Program design covered well the evidence-informed best practices except for clear path toward sustainability, cooperation with occupational health care, and support from middle-management supervisors. The penetration rate among participants was high (99%) and majority (81%) of services were implemented as designed. Conclusion: Study findings indicate that WHP market would benefit the use of evidence-based design principles and tendentious decisions to anticipate a long-term implementation process already during the planning phase.
Published Version: doi:10.1097/JOM.0000000000001067
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5540356/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34375332
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