Individual Differences in Frequency and Topography of Slow and Fast Sleep Spindles

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Individual Differences in Frequency and Topography of Slow and Fast Sleep Spindles

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Individual Differences in Frequency and Topography of Slow and Fast Sleep Spindles
Author: Cox, Roy; Schapiro, Anna C.; Manoach, Dara S.; Stickgold, Robert

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Cox, Roy, Anna C. Schapiro, Dara S. Manoach, and Robert Stickgold. 2017. “Individual Differences in Frequency and Topography of Slow and Fast Sleep Spindles.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11 (1): 433. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00433. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00433.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Sleep spindles are transient oscillatory waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep across widespread cortical areas. In humans, spindles can be classified as either slow or fast, but large individual differences in spindle frequency as well as methodological difficulties have hindered progress towards understanding their function. Using two nights of high-density electroencephalography recordings from 28 healthy individuals, we first characterize the individual variability of NREM spectra and demonstrate the difficulty of determining subject-specific spindle frequencies. We then introduce a novel spatial filtering approach that can reliably separate subject-specific spindle activity into slow and fast components that are stable across nights and across N2 and N3 sleep. We then proceed to provide detailed analyses of the topographical expression of individualized slow and fast spindle activity. Group-level analyses conform to known spatial properties of spindles, but also uncover novel differences between sleep stages and spindle classes. Moreover, subject-specific examinations reveal that individual topographies show considerable variability that is stable across nights. Finally, we demonstrate that topographical maps depend nontrivially on the spindle metric employed. In sum, our findings indicate that group-level approaches mask substantial individual variability of spindle dynamics, in both the spectral and spatial domains. We suggest that leveraging, rather than ignoring, such differences may prove useful to further our understanding of the physiology and functional role of sleep spindles.
Published Version: doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00433
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5591792/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34491900
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters