Clinical Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery: Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Clinical Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery: Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Clinical Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery: Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications
Author: Adams, Ted D.; Arterburn, David E.; Nathan, David M.; Eckel, Robert H.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Adams, Ted D., David E. Arterburn, David M. Nathan, and Robert H. Eckel. 2016. “Clinical Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery: Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications.” Diabetes Care 39 (6): 912-923. doi:10.2337/dc16-0157. http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc16-0157.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Understanding of the long-term clinical outcomes associated with bariatric surgery has recently been advanced. Research related to the sequelae of diabetes—in particular, long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications—in patients who undergo weight-loss surgery is imperative to this pursuit. While numerous randomized control trials have assessed glucose control with bariatric surgery compared with intensive medical therapy, bariatric surgery outcome data relating to microvascular and macrovascular complications have been limited to observational studies and nonrandomized clinical trials. As a result, whether bariatric surgery is associated with a long-term reduction in microvascular and macrovascular complications when compared with current intensive glycemic control therapy cannot be determined because the evidence is insufficient. However, the consistent salutary effects of bariatric surgery on diabetes remission and glycemic improvement support the opportunity (and need) to conduct high-quality studies of bariatric surgery versus intensive glucose control. This review provides relevant background information related to the treatment of diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long-term complications; reports clinical findings (to date) with bariatric surgery; and identifies ongoing research focusing on long-term vascular outcomes associated with bariatric surgery.
Published Version: doi:10.2337/dc16-0157
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5562446/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34491902
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters