Targeted disruption of supraspinal motor circuitry reveals a distributed network underlying Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)-like movements in the rat

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Targeted disruption of supraspinal motor circuitry reveals a distributed network underlying Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)-like movements in the rat

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Title: Targeted disruption of supraspinal motor circuitry reveals a distributed network underlying Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)-like movements in the rat
Author: Guo, Chun-Ni; Yang, Wen-Jia; Zhan, Shi-Qin; Yang, Xi-Fei; Chen, Michael C.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Lu, Jun

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Citation: Guo, Chun-Ni, Wen-Jia Yang, Shi-Qin Zhan, Xi-Fei Yang, Michael C. Chen, Patrick M. Fuller, and Jun Lu. 2017. “Targeted disruption of supraspinal motor circuitry reveals a distributed network underlying Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)-like movements in the rat.” Scientific Reports 7 (1): 9905. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-10284-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-10284-3.
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Abstract: In this study we uncovered, through targeted ablation, a potential role for corticospinal, cerebello-rubro-spinal, and hypothalamic A11 dopaminergic systems in the development of restless legs syndrome (RLS)-like movements during sleep. Targeted lesions in select basal ganglia (BG) structures also revealed a major role for nigrostriatal dopamine, the striatum, and the external globus pallidus (GPe) in regulating RLS-like movements, in particular pallidocortical projections from the GPe to the motor cortex. We further showed that pramipexiole, a dopamine agonist used to treat human RLS, reduced RLS-like movements. Taken together, our data show that BG-cortico-spinal, cerebello-rubro-spinal and A11 descending projections all contribute to the suppression of motor activity during sleep and sleep-wake transitions, and that disruption of these circuit nodes produces RLS-like movements. Taken together with findings from recent genomic studies in humans, our findings provide additional support for the concept that the anatomic and genetic etiological bases of RLS are diverse.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/s41598-017-10284-3
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5575019/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492016
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