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dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Dustin T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAldstadt, Jareden_US
dc.contributor.authorWhalen, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Kelleeen_US
dc.contributor.authorCastro, Marcia C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, David R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T05:49:33Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.citationDuncan, Dustin T., Jared Aldstadt, John Whalen, Kellee White, Marcia C. Castro, and David R. Williams. 2017. “Space, race, and poverty: Spatial inequalities in walkable neighborhood amenities?” Demographic research 26 (17): 409-448. doi:10.4054/DemRes.2012.26.17. http://dx.doi.org/10.4054/DemRes.2012.26.17.en
dc.identifier.issnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492136
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Multiple and varied benefits have been suggested for increased neighborhood walkability. However, spatial inequalities in neighborhood walkability likely exist and may be attributable, in part, to residential segregation. OBJECTIVE Utilizing a spatial demographic perspective, we evaluated potential spatial inequalities in walkable neighborhood amenities across census tracts in Boston, MA (US). METHODS The independent variables included minority racial/ethnic population percentages and percent of families in poverty. Walkable neighborhood amenities were assessed with a composite measure. Spatial autocorrelation in key study variables were first calculated with the Global Moran’s I statistic. Then, Spearman correlations between neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and walkable neighborhood amenities were calculated as well as Spearman correlations accounting for spatial autocorrelation. We fit ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and spatial autoregressive models, when appropriate, as a final step. RESULTS Significant positive spatial autocorrelation was found in neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics (e.g. census tract percent Black), but not walkable neighborhood amenities or in the OLS regression residuals. Spearman correlations between neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and walkable neighborhood amenities were not statistically significant, nor were neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics significantly associated with walkable neighborhood amenities in OLS regression models. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that there is residential segregation in Boston and that spatial inequalities do not necessarily show up using a composite measure. COMMENTS Future research in other geographic areas (including international contexts) and using different definitions of neighborhoods (including small-area definitions) should evaluate if spatial inequalities are found using composite measures but also should use measures of specific neighborhood amenities.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.4054/DemRes.2012.26.17en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5642981/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.titleSpace, race, and poverty: Spatial inequalities in walkable neighborhood amenities?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalDemographic researchen
dash.depositing.authorDuncan, Dustin T.en_US
dc.date.available2017-12-06T05:49:33Z
dc.identifier.doi10.4054/DemRes.2012.26.17*
dash.contributor.affiliatedDuncan, Dustin T.
dash.contributor.affiliatedWilliams, David
dash.contributor.affiliatedCastro, Marcia


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