Decreased insulin‐stimulated brown adipose tissue glucose uptake after short‐term exercise training in healthy middle‐aged men

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Decreased insulin‐stimulated brown adipose tissue glucose uptake after short‐term exercise training in healthy middle‐aged men

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Decreased insulin‐stimulated brown adipose tissue glucose uptake after short‐term exercise training in healthy middle‐aged men
Author: Motiani, Piryanka; Virtanen, Kirsi A.; Motiani, Kumail K.; Eskelinen, Joonas J.; Middelbeek, Roeland J.; Goodyear, Laurie J.; Savolainen, Anna M.; Kemppainen, Jukka; Jensen, Jørgen; Din, Mueez U.; Saunavaara, Virva; Parkkola, Riitta; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Knuuti, Juhani; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kalliokoski, Kari K.; Hannukainen, Jarna C.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Motiani, P., K. A. Virtanen, K. K. Motiani, J. J. Eskelinen, R. J. Middelbeek, L. J. Goodyear, A. M. Savolainen, et al. 2017. “Decreased insulin‐stimulated brown adipose tissue glucose uptake after short‐term exercise training in healthy middle‐aged men.” Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism 19 (10): 1379-1388. doi:10.1111/dom.12947. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dom.12947.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Aims To test the hypothesis that high‐intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate‐intensity continuous training (MICT) improve brown adipose tissue (BAT) insulin sensitivity. Participants and methods Healthy middle‐aged men (n = 18, age 47 years [95% confidence interval {CI} 49, 43], body mass index 25.3 kg/m2 [95% CI 24.1‐26.3], peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) 34.8 mL/kg/min [95% CI 32.1, 37.4] ) were recruited and randomized into six HIIT or MICT sessions within 2 weeks. Insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake was measured using 2‐[18F]flouro‐2‐deoxy‐D‐glucose positron‐emission tomography in BAT, skeletal muscle, and abdominal and femoral subcutaneous and visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) depots before and after the training interventions. Results: Training improved VO2peak (P = .0005), insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake into the quadriceps femoris muscle (P = .0009) and femoral subcutaneous WAT (P = .02) but not into BAT, with no difference between the training modes. Using pre‐intervention BAT glucose uptake, we next stratified subjects into high BAT (>2.9 µmol/100 g/min; n = 6) or low BAT (<2.9 µmol/100 g/min; n = 12) groups. Interestingly, training decreased insulin‐stimulated BAT glucose uptake in the high BAT group (4.0 [2.8, 5.5] vs 2.5 [1.7, 3.6]; training*BAT, P = .02), whereas there was no effect of training in the low BAT group (1.5 [1.2, 1.9] vs 1.6 [1.2, 2.0] µmol/100 g/min). Participants in the high BAT group had lower levels of inflammatory markers compared with those in the low BAT group. Conclusions: Participants with functionally active BAT have an improved metabolic profile compared with those with low BAT activity. Short‐term exercise training decreased insulin‐stimulated BAT glucose uptake in participants with active BAT, suggesting that training does not work as a potent stimulus for BAT activation.
Published Version: doi:10.1111/dom.12947
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5607085/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492254
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters