Professional Medical Interpreters Influence the Quality of Acute Ischemic Stroke Care for Patients Who Speak Languages Other than English

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Professional Medical Interpreters Influence the Quality of Acute Ischemic Stroke Care for Patients Who Speak Languages Other than English

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Title: Professional Medical Interpreters Influence the Quality of Acute Ischemic Stroke Care for Patients Who Speak Languages Other than English
Author: Luan Erfe, Betty M.; Siddiqui, Khawja A.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Kirwan, Chris; Nunes, Anabela; Mejia, Nicte I.

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Citation: Luan Erfe, Betty M., Khawja A. Siddiqui, Lee H. Schwamm, Chris Kirwan, Anabela Nunes, and Nicte I. Mejia. 2017. “Professional Medical Interpreters Influence the Quality of Acute Ischemic Stroke Care for Patients Who Speak Languages Other than English.” Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 6 (9): e006175. doi:10.1161/JAHA.117.006175. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.006175.
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Abstract: Background: The inability to communicate effectively in a common language can jeopardize clinicians’ efforts to provide quality patient care. Professional medical interpreters (PMIs) can help provide linguistically appropriate health care, in particular for the >25 million Americans who identify speaking English less than very well. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between use of PMIs and quality of acute ischemic stroke care received by patients who preferred to have their medical care in languages other than English. Methods and Results: We analyzed data from 259 non–English‐preferring acute ischemic stroke patients who participated in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program at our hospital from January 1, 2003, to April 30, 2014. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression models to examine associations between involvement of PMIs and patients’ receipt of defect‐free stroke care. A total of 147 of 259 (57%) non–English‐preferring patients received PMI services during their hospital stays. Multivariable analyses adjusting for other socioeconomic factors showed that acute ischemic stroke patients who did not receive PMIs had lower odds of receiving defect‐free stroke care (odds ratio: 0.52; P=0.04). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that PMIs may influence the quality of acute ischemic stroke care.
Published Version: doi:10.1161/JAHA.117.006175
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5634277/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492302
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