Estimating the Selective Effects of Heterozygous Protein Truncating Variants from Human Exome Data

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Estimating the Selective Effects of Heterozygous Protein Truncating Variants from Human Exome Data

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Title: Estimating the Selective Effects of Heterozygous Protein Truncating Variants from Human Exome Data
Author: Cassa, Christopher A.; Weghorn, Donate; Balick, Daniel J.; Jordan, Daniel M.; Nusinow, David; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; O’Donnell-Luria, Anne; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Daly, Mark J.; Beier, David R.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

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Citation: Cassa, C. A., D. Weghorn, D. J. Balick, D. M. Jordan, D. Nusinow, K. E. Samocha, A. O’Donnell-Luria, et al. 2017. “Estimating the Selective Effects of Heterozygous Protein Truncating Variants from Human Exome Data.” Nature genetics 49 (5): 806-810. doi:10.1038/ng.3831. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3831.
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Abstract: The dispensability of individual genes for viability has interested generations of geneticists. For some genes it is essential to maintain two functional chromosomal copies, while others may tolerate the loss of one or both copies. Exome sequence data from 60,706 individuals provide sufficient observations of rare protein truncating variants (PTVs) to make genome-wide estimates of selection against heterozygous loss of gene function. The cumulative frequency of rare deleterious PTVs is primarily determined by the balance between incoming mutations and purifying selection rather than genetic drift. This enables the estimation of the genome-wide distribution of selection coefficients for heterozygous PTVs and corresponding Bayesian estimates for individual genes. The strength of selection can discriminate the severity, age of onset, and mode of inheritance in Mendelian exome sequencing cases. We find that genes under the strongest selection are enriched in embryonic lethal mouse knockouts, putatively cell-essential genes, Mendelian disease genes, and regulators of transcription. Screening by essentiality, we find a large set of genes under strong selection that likely have critical function but have not yet been extensively annotated in published literature.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/ng.3831
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618255/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492340
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