Facilitating access to surgical care through a decentralised case-finding strategy: experience in Madagascar

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Facilitating access to surgical care through a decentralised case-finding strategy: experience in Madagascar

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Title: Facilitating access to surgical care through a decentralised case-finding strategy: experience in Madagascar
Author: White, Michelle C; Hamer, Mirjam; Biddell, Jasmin; Claus, Nathan; Randall, Kirsten; Alcorn, Dennis; Parker, Gary; Shrime, Mark G ORCID  0000-0002-3546-9867

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Citation: White, Michelle C, Mirjam Hamer, Jasmin Biddell, Nathan Claus, Kirsten Randall, Dennis Alcorn, Gary Parker, and Mark G Shrime. 2017. “Facilitating access to surgical care through a decentralised case-finding strategy: experience in Madagascar.” BMJ Global Health 2 (3): e000427. doi:10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000427. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000427.
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Abstract: Over two-thirds of the world’s population lack access to surgical care. Non-governmental organisation’s providing free surgeries may overcome financial barriers, but other barriers to care still exist. This analysis paper discusses two different case-finding strategies in Madagascar that aimed to increase the proportion of poor patients, women and those for whom multiple barriers to care exist. From October 2014 to June 2015, we used a centralised selection strategy, aiming to find 70% of patients from the port city, Toamasina, and 30% from the national capital and two remote cities. From August 2015 to June 2016, a decentralised strategy was used, aiming to find 30% of patients from Toamasina and 70% from 11 remote locations, including the capital. Demographic information and self-reported barriers to care were collected. Wealth quintile was calculated for each patient using a combination of participant responses to asset-related and demographic questions, and publicly available data. A total of 2971 patients were assessed. The change from centralised to decentralised selection resulted in significantly poorer patients undergoing surgery. All reported barriers to prior care, except for lack of transportation, were significantly more likely to be identified in the decentralised group. Patients who identified multiple barriers to prior surgical care were less likely to be from the richest quintile (p=0.037) and more likely to be in the decentralised group (p=0.046). Our country-specific analysis shows that decentralised patient selection strategies may be used to overcome barriers to care and allow patients in greatest need to access surgical care.
Published Version: doi:10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000427
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5640035/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492376
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