General practitioner attitudes towards prescribing aspirin to carriers of Lynch Syndrome: findings from a national survey

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General practitioner attitudes towards prescribing aspirin to carriers of Lynch Syndrome: findings from a national survey

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Title: General practitioner attitudes towards prescribing aspirin to carriers of Lynch Syndrome: findings from a national survey
Author: Smith, Samuel G.; Foy, Robbie; McGowan, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Lindsay C.; Burn, John; Brown, Karen; Side, Lucy; Cuzick, Jack

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Citation: Smith, Samuel G., Robbie Foy, Jennifer McGowan, Lindsay C. Kobayashi, John Burn, Karen Brown, Lucy Side, and Jack Cuzick. 2017. “General practitioner attitudes towards prescribing aspirin to carriers of Lynch Syndrome: findings from a national survey.” Familial Cancer 16 (4): 509-516. doi:10.1007/s10689-017-9986-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-017-9986-9.
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Abstract: A dose non-inferiority study comparing 100 mg, 300 mg and 600 mg of aspirin for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome carriers is underway (Colorectal Adenoma/Carcinoma Prevention Programme trial 3, CaPP3). To guide implementation of the findings, we investigated general practitioner (GP) attitudes towards aspirin prescribing for Lynch Syndrome carriers. We surveyed 1007 UK GPs (9.6% response rate). Using a within-subjects design, GPs read a statement on harms and benefits of aspirin and indicated their willingness to prescribe aspirin at three doses (100 mg, 300 mg, 600 mg). Approximately two-thirds (70.8%) of GPs had heard of Lynch Syndrome or its associated names, and among those 46.7% were aware of the cancer preventive effects of aspirin among carriers. Two-thirds (68.1%) of GPs reported feeling comfortable discussing harms and benefits of aspirin with a Lynch Syndrome patient. Willingness to prescribe was 91.3% at 100 mg, and declined to 81.8% at 300 mg and 62.3% at 600 mg (p < 0.001). In multivariable analyses, willingness to prescribe (600 mg) was higher among GPs ≥50 years (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.03–2.07), more experienced GPs (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.10–2.04), GPs who were aware of the cancer preventive effects of aspirin (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.20–2.09), and those who reported seeing a Lynch Syndrome patient in practice (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.01–2.05, p = 0.045). GPs report limited awareness of Lynch Syndrome and the preventive effects of aspirin among carriers. To ensure the optimal dose identified in the CaPP3 trial is readily available to patients, prescribing guidance and strategies to educate GPs should be developed.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s10689-017-9986-9
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5603645/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492473
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