High status males invest more than high status females in lower status same-sex collaborators

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High status males invest more than high status females in lower status same-sex collaborators

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Title: High status males invest more than high status females in lower status same-sex collaborators
Author: Markovits, Henry; Gauthier, Evelyne; Gagnon-St-Pierre, Émilie; Benenson, Joyce F.

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Citation: Markovits, Henry, Evelyne Gauthier, Émilie Gagnon-St-Pierre, and Joyce F. Benenson. 2017. “High status males invest more than high status females in lower status same-sex collaborators.” PLoS ONE 12 (9): e0185408. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0185408. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185408.
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Abstract: Studies on human cooperation using economic games rarely include ecologically relevant factors. In studies on non-human primates however, both status and sex typically influence patterns of cooperation. Across primate species, high status individuals are more likely to cooperate, though this depends on the species-specific social structure of each sex. Based on human social structure, we predict that higher status males who interact more in hierarchical groups than females, will invest more than high status females in valued same-sex peers after successful cooperation. Across three studies, 187 male and 188 female participants cooperated with a (fictitious) same-sex partner who varied in competence. Participants then divided a reward between themselves and their partner. High status was induced in three different ways in each study, social influence, leadership and power. No overall sex difference in reward sharing was observed. Consistent with the hypothesis however, across all three studies, high status males invested more than high status females in cooperative partners, suggesting that high status males intuitively evaluate sharing rewards with same-sex partners as more beneficial.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0185408
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5617204/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34492504
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