MRI Simulation Study Investigating Effects of Vessel Topology, Diffusion, and Susceptibility on Transverse Relaxation Rates Using a Cylinder Fork Model

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MRI Simulation Study Investigating Effects of Vessel Topology, Diffusion, and Susceptibility on Transverse Relaxation Rates Using a Cylinder Fork Model

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Title: MRI Simulation Study Investigating Effects of Vessel Topology, Diffusion, and Susceptibility on Transverse Relaxation Rates Using a Cylinder Fork Model
Author: Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Issa, Bashar

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Citation: Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman, Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer, and Bashar Issa. 2017. “MRI Simulation Study Investigating Effects of Vessel Topology, Diffusion, and Susceptibility on Transverse Relaxation Rates Using a Cylinder Fork Model.” Scientific Reports 7 (1): 16223. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15968-4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15968-4.
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Abstract: Brain vasculature is conventionally represented as straight cylinders when simulating blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast effects in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In reality, the vasculature is more complicated with branching and coiling especially in tumors. Diffusion and susceptibility changes can also introduce variations in the relaxation mechanisms within tumors. This study introduces a simple cylinder fork model (CFM) and investigates the effects of vessel topology, diffusion, and susceptibility on the transverse relaxation rates R2* and R2. Simulations using Monte Carlo methods were performed to quantify R2* and R2 by manipulating the CFM at different orientations, bifurcation angles, and rotation angles. Other parameters of the CFM were chosen based on physiologically relevant values: vessel diameters (~2‒10 µm), diffusion rates (1 × 10−11‒1 × 10−9 m2/s), and susceptibility values (3 × 10−8–4 × 10−7 cgs units). R2* and R2 measurements showed a significant dependence on the bifurcation and rotation angles in several scenarios using different vessel diameters, orientations, diffusion rates, and susceptibility values. The angular dependence of R2* and R2 using the CFM could potentially be exploited as a tool to differentiate between normal and tumor vessels. The CFM can also serve as the elementary building block to simulate a capillary network reflecting realistic topological features.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15968-4
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5701222/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34493187
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