Clinical assessment, neuroimaging and immunomarkers in Chagas disease study (CLINICS): Rationale, study design and preliminary findings

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Clinical assessment, neuroimaging and immunomarkers in Chagas disease study (CLINICS): Rationale, study design and preliminary findings

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Title: Clinical assessment, neuroimaging and immunomarkers in Chagas disease study (CLINICS): Rationale, study design and preliminary findings
Author: Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Dias, Jesângeli de S.; Jesus, Pedro A.P.; Neto, Nestor J.S.B.; Aras, Roque; Reis, Francisco J.F.B.; Furie, Karen L.

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Citation: Oliveira-Filho, Jamary, Jesângeli de S. Dias, Pedro A.P. Jesus, Nestor J.S.B. Neto, Roque Aras, Francisco J.F.B. Reis, and Karen L. Furie. 2012. “Clinical assessment, neuroimaging and immunomarkers in Chagas disease study (CLINICS): Rationale, study design and preliminary findings.” Dementia & Neuropsychologia 6 (3): 180-187. doi:10.1590/S1980-57642012DN06030012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1980-57642012DN06030012.
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Abstract: Chagas disease (CD) is an important cause of cardiomyopathy and stroke in Brazil. Brain infarcts and atrophy seem to occur independently of cardiomyopathy severity and cognitive impairment is understudied. Objective: Compare the prevalence of brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities between patients with or without CD; determine if inflammatory biomarkers are increased in CD; and determine the efficacy of aspirin in reducing the rate of microembolization in these patients. Methods: 500 consecutive patients with heart failure will undergo a structured cognitive evaluation, biomarker collection and search for microembolic signals on transcranial Doppler. The first 90 patients are described, evaluated with cognitive tests and brain magnetic resonance imaging to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (MI) and creatine (Cr). Results: Mean age was 55±11 years, 51% female, 38 (42%) with CD. Mean NAA/Cr ratio was lower in patients with CD as compared to other cardiomyopathies. Long-term memory and clock-drawing test were also significantly worse in CD patients. In the multivariable analysis correcting for ejection fraction, age, sex and educational level, reduced NAA/Cr (p=0.006) and cognitive dysfunction (long-term memory, p=0.023; clock-drawing test, p=0.015) remained associated with CD. Conclusion: In this preliminary sample, CD was associated with cognitive impairment and decreased NAA/Cr independently of cardiac function or educational level.
Published Version: doi:10.1590/S1980-57642012DN06030012
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618967/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34651794
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