Tai Chi Is a Promising Exercise Option for Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Declining Cardiac Rehabilitation

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Tai Chi Is a Promising Exercise Option for Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Declining Cardiac Rehabilitation

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Tai Chi Is a Promising Exercise Option for Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Declining Cardiac Rehabilitation
Author: Salmoirago‐Blotcher, Elena; Wayne, Peter M.; Dunsiger, Shira; Krol, Julie; Breault, Christopher; Bock, Beth C.; Wu, Wen‐Chih; Yeh, Gloria Y.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Salmoirago‐Blotcher, Elena, Peter M. Wayne, Shira Dunsiger, Julie Krol, Christopher Breault, Beth C. Bock, Wen‐Chih Wu, and Gloria Y. Yeh. 2017. “Tai Chi Is a Promising Exercise Option for Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Declining Cardiac Rehabilitation.” Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 6 (10): e006603. doi:10.1161/JAHA.117.006603. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.006603.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: More than 60% of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation after a myocardial infarction. Options to improve physical activity (PA) and other risk factors in these high‐risk individuals are limited. We conducted a phase 2 randomized controlled trial to determine feasibility, safety, acceptability, and estimates of effect of tai chi on PA, fitness, weight, and quality of life. Methods and Results: Patients with coronary heart disease declining cardiac rehabilitation enrollment were randomized to a “LITE” (2 sessions/week for 12 weeks) or to a “PLUS” (3 sessions/week for 12 weeks, then maintenance classes for 12 additional weeks) condition. PA (accelerometry), weight, and quality of life (Health Survey Short Form) were measured at baseline and 3, 6, and 9 months after baseline; aerobic fitness (stress test) was measured at 3 months. Twenty‐nine participants (13 PLUS and 16 LITE) were enrolled. Retention at 9 months was 90% (LITE) and 88% (PLUS). No serious tai chi–related adverse events occurred. Significant mean between group differences in favor of the PLUS group were observed at 3 and 6 months for moderate‐to‐vigorous PA (100.33 min/week [95% confidence interval, 15.70–184.95 min/week] and 111.62 min/week; [95% confidence interval, 26.17–197.07 min/week], respectively, with a trend toward significance at 9 months), percentage change in weight, and quality of life. No changes in aerobic fitness were observed within and between groups. Conclusions: In this community sample of patients with coronary heart disease declining enrollment in cardiac rehabilitation, a 6‐month tai chi program was safe and improved PA, weight, and quality of life compared with a 3‐month intervention. Tai chi could be an effective option to improve PA in this high‐risk population. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02165254.
Published Version: doi:10.1161/JAHA.117.006603
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5721863/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34651918
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters