Underweight vs. overweight/obese: which weight category do we prefer? Dissociation of weight‐related preferences at the explicit and implicit level

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Underweight vs. overweight/obese: which weight category do we prefer? Dissociation of weight‐related preferences at the explicit and implicit level

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Title: Underweight vs. overweight/obese: which weight category do we prefer? Dissociation of weight‐related preferences at the explicit and implicit level
Author: Marini, M.
Citation: Marini, M. 2017. “Underweight vs. overweight/obese: which weight category do we prefer? Dissociation of weight‐related preferences at the explicit and implicit level.” Obesity Science & Practice 3 (4): 390-398. doi:10.1002/osp4.136. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/osp4.136.
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Abstract: Summary Objective: Although stigma towards obesity and anorexia is a well‐recognized problem, no research has investigated and compared the explicit (i.e. conscious) and implicit (i.e. unconscious) preferences between these two conditions. The present study conducted this investigation in a sample of 4,806 volunteers recruited at the Project Implicit website (https://implicit.harvard.edu). Methods: Explicit and implicit preferences were assessed among different weight categories (i.e. underweight, normal weight and overweight/obese) by means of self‐reported items and the Multi‐category Implicit Association Test, respectively. Results: Preferences for the normal weight category were found both at the explicit and implicit levels when this category was compared with overweight/obese and underweight categories. On the contrary, when the underweight category was contrasted with the obese/overweight category, results differed at the explicit and implicit levels: pro‐underweight preferences were observed at the explicit level, while pro‐overweight/obese preferences were found at the implicit level. Conclusions: These results indicate that preferences between overweight/obese and underweight categories differ at the explicit and implicit levels. This dissociation may have important implications on behaviour and decision‐making.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/osp4.136
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5729491/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34651998
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