Facilitators and barriers to healthy eating in a worksite cafeteria: a qualitative study from Nepal

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Facilitators and barriers to healthy eating in a worksite cafeteria: a qualitative study from Nepal

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Title: Facilitators and barriers to healthy eating in a worksite cafeteria: a qualitative study from Nepal
Author: Shrestha, Archana; Pyakurel, Prajjwal; Shrestha, Abha; Gautam, Rabin; Manandhar, Nisha; Rhodes, Elizabeth; Tamrakar, Dipesh; Karmacharya, Biraj Man; Malik, Vasanti; Mattei, Josiemer; Spiegelman, Donna

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Shrestha, A., P. Pyakurel, A. Shrestha, R. Gautam, N. Manandhar, E. Rhodes, D. Tamrakar, et al. 2017. “Facilitators and barriers to healthy eating in a worksite cafeteria: a qualitative study from Nepal.” Heart Asia 9 (2): e010956. doi:10.1136/heartasia-2017-010956. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/heartasia-2017-010956.
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Abstract: Objective: Worksite interventions can serve as a potential platform for translating existing knowledge of diabetes prevention and facilitate healthy food choices. The study explored perceptions about healthy eating as well as potential facilitators and barriers to healthy eating among employees in a wire manufacturing factory in Nepal. Methods and materials We conducted a cross-sectional exploratory qualitative study in a wire manufacturing industry in eastern Nepal. We conducted three focus group discussions (FGDs) with a total of 26 employees and four in-depth interviews (IDIs) with cafeteria operators/managers from a wire manufacturing factory in eastern Nepal. FGDs and IDIs were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the thematic method. Results: Most employees defined healthy eating as the consumption of food prepared and maintained using hygienic practices and fresh foods in general. Major barriers to healthy eating included unavailability of healthy foods, difficulty in changing eating habits, the preference for fried foods in Nepali culture and the high costs of some healthy foods. The most commonly reported facilitator of healthy eating was the availability of affordable healthy food options in worksite cafeterias. Conclusion: Availability of healthy food options at an affordable price could lead to healthier food choices in the worksite.
Published Version: doi:10.1136/heartasia-2017-010956
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5708323/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34652028
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