Estimating the value of point-of-care HPV testing in three low- and middle-income countries: a modeling study

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Estimating the value of point-of-care HPV testing in three low- and middle-income countries: a modeling study

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Title: Estimating the value of point-of-care HPV testing in three low- and middle-income countries: a modeling study
Author: Campos, Nicole G.; Tsu, Vivien; Jeronimo, Jose; Mvundura, Mercy; Kim, Jane J.

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Citation: Campos, Nicole G., Vivien Tsu, Jose Jeronimo, Mercy Mvundura, and Jane J. Kim. 2017. “Estimating the value of point-of-care HPV testing in three low- and middle-income countries: a modeling study.” BMC Cancer 17 (1): 791. doi:10.1186/s12885-017-3786-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-017-3786-3.
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Abstract: Background: Where resources are available, the World Health Organization recommends cervical cancer screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing and subsequent treatment of HPV-positive women with timely cryotherapy. Newer technologies may facilitate a same-day screen-and-treat approach, but these testing systems are generally too expensive for widespread use in low-resource settings. Methods: To assess the value of a hypothetical point-of-care HPV test, we used a mathematical simulation model of the natural history of HPV and data from the START-UP multi-site demonstration project to estimate the health benefits and costs associated with a shift from a 2-visit approach (requiring a return visit for treatment) to 1-visit HPV testing (i.e., screen-and-treat). We estimated the incremental net monetary benefit (INMB), which represents the maximum additional lifetime cost per woman that could be incurred for a new point-of-care HPV test to be cost-effective, depending on expected loss to follow-up between visits (LTFU) in a given setting. Results: For screening three times in a lifetime at 100% coverage of the target population, when LTFU was 10%, the INMB of the 1-visit relative to the 2-visit approach was I$13 in India, I$36 in Nicaragua, and I$17 in Uganda. If LTFU was 30% or greater, the INMB values for the 1-visit approach in all countries was equivalent to or exceeded total lifetime costs associated with screening three times in a lifetime. At a LTFU level of 70%, the INMB of the 1-visit approach was I$127 in India, I$399 in Nicaragua, and I$121 in Uganda. Conclusions: These findings indicate that point-of-care technology for cervical cancer screening may be worthy of high investment if linkage to treatment can be assured, particularly in settings where LTFU is high. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1186/s12885-017-3786-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s12885-017-3786-3
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5702206/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34652037
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