Serotonergic modulation of odor input to the mammalian olfactory bulb

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Serotonergic modulation of odor input to the mammalian olfactory bulb

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Serotonergic modulation of odor input to the mammalian olfactory bulb
Author: Petzold, Gabor C.; Hagiwara, Akari; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Petzold, Gabor C, Akari Hagiwara, and Venkatesh N Murthy. 2009. “Serotonergic Modulation of Odor Input to the Mammalian Olfactory Bulb.” Nature Neuroscience 12 (6) (May 10): 784–791. doi:10.1038/nn.2335.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Centrifugal serotonergic fibers innervate the olfactory bulb, but the importance of these projections for olfactory processing is unclear. We examined serotonergic modulation of sensory input to olfactory glomeruli using mice that express synaptopHluorin in olfactory receptor neurons (ORN). Odor-evoked synaptic input to glomeruli was attenuated by increased serotonin signaling through serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) receptors and amplified by decreased serotonergic activity. Intravital multiphoton calcium imaging revealed that 5-HT2C receptor activation amplified odor-evoked activity in a subset of juxtaglomerular cells and attenuated glutamate release from ORN terminals via GABAB receptors. Endogenous serotonin released by electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus attenuated odor-evoked responses without detectable bias in glomerular position or odor identity. Weaker glomerular responses, however, were less sensitive to raphe stimulation than strong responses. Our data indicate that the serotonergic system regulates odor inputs in the olfactory bulb and suggest that behavioral states may alter odor processing at the earliest stages.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/nn.2335
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19430472
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34728636
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters