The effects of Obama's political success on the self-rated health of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites

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The effects of Obama's political success on the self-rated health of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites

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Title: The effects of Obama's political success on the self-rated health of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites
Author: Malat, Jennifer; Timberlake, Jeffrey; Williams, David

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Citation: Malat, Jennifer, Jeffrey M. Timberlake, and David R. Williams. 2011. The effects of Obama's political success on the self-rated health of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites. Ethnicity and Disease 21, no. 3: 349-355.
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Abstract: Stress in the social environment can affect individual health. Election of the first Black President of the United States provides an opportunity to assess how a positive change in the macro-political climate impacts the health of Americans. Past research suggests that race-related political events influence the health of non-dominant racial groups. Yet many questions remain, including the types of events that affect health, the timing and durability of health effects, and whether effects are similar for Blacks and Hispanics in the United States. The present study uses data from the Ohio Family Health Survey, which was in the field from August 6, 2008 until January 24, 2009, to assess whether immediate changes in average self-rated health occurred after key events in the election of President Barack Obama. We find better average health ratings among Blacks and Hispanics immediately following Obama’s nomination by the Democratic Party. Similar effects did not occur after the election or inauguration, and Whites showed no effect of any of the events. We discuss the implications of these findings in terms of the theoretical links between macro-level social conditions, race/ethnicity, and health.
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34730533
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