Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and experimental studies

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Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and experimental studies

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Title: Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and experimental studies
Author: Fox, Donald A.; Grandjean, Philippe; de Groot, Didima; Paule, Merle G.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Fox, Donald A., Philippe Grandjean, Didima de Groot, and Merle G. Paule. 2012. “Developmental Origins of Adult Diseases and Neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and Experimental Studies.” NeuroToxicology 33 (4) (August): 810–816. doi:10.1016/j.neuro.2011.12.016.
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Abstract: To date, only a small number of commercial chemicals have been tested and documented as developmental neurotoxicants. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies suggest an association between toxicant or drug exposure during the perinatal period and the development of metabolic-related diseases and neurotoxicity later in life. The four speakers in this symposium presented their research results on different neurotoxic chemicals as they relate to the developmental origins of health and adult disease (DOHaD). Philippe Grandjean presented epidemiological data on children exposed to methylmercury and discussed the behavioral outcome measures as they relate to age and stage of brain development. Donald A. Fox presented data that low-to-moderate dose human equivalent gestational lead exposure produced late-onset obesity, and motor and coordination dysfunction only in male mice. Didima de Groot discussed the role of caloric restriction and/or high fat diets during gestation and/or postnatal development in mediating the metabolic and neurotoxic effects of developmental methylmercury exposure in rats. Merle G. Paule addressed the long-term changes in learning, motivation and short-term memory in aged Rhesus monkeys following 24 hour exposure to ketamine during early development. Overall, these presentations addressed fundamental issues in the emerging areas of lifetime neurotoxicity testing, differential vulnerable periods of exposure, nonmonotonic dose-response effects and neurotoxic risk assessment.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.neuro.2011.12.016
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3657611/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34767896
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