Delayed brainstem auditory evoked potential latencies in 14-year-old children exposed to methylmercury

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Delayed brainstem auditory evoked potential latencies in 14-year-old children exposed to methylmercury

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Title: Delayed brainstem auditory evoked potential latencies in 14-year-old children exposed to methylmercury
Author: Murata, Katsuyuki; Weihe, Pal; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Jørgensen, Poul J; Grandjean, Philippe

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Murata, Katsuyuki, Pál Weihe, Esben Budtz-Jørgensen, Poul J Jørgensen, and Philippe Grandjean. 2004. “Delayed Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential Latencies in 14-Year-Old Children Exposed to Methylmercury.” The Journal of Pediatrics 144 (2) (February): 177–183. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2003.10.059.
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Abstract: Objective

To determine possible exposure-associated delays in auditory brainstem evoked potential latencies as an objective measure of neurobehavioral toxicity in 14-year-old children with developmental exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) from seafood.

Study design

Prospective study of a birth cohort in the Faroe Islands, where 878 of eligible children (87%) were examined at age 14 years. Latencies of brainstem evoked potential peaks I, III, and V at 20 and 40 Hz constituted the outcome variables. Mercury concentrations were determined in cord blood and maternal hair, and in the child's hair at ages 7 and 14.

Results

Latencies of peaks III and V increased by about 0.012 ms when the cord blood mercury concentration doubled. As seen at age 7 years, this effect appeared mainly within the I–III interpeak interval. Despite lower postnatal exposures, the child's hair mercury level at age 14 years was associated with prolonged III–V interpeak latencies. All benchmark dose results were similar to those obtained for dose-response relationships at age 7 years.

Conclusions

The persistence of prolonged I–III interpeak intervals indicates that some neurotoxic effects from intrauterine MeHg exposure are irreversible. A change in vulnerability to MeHg toxicity is suggested by the apparent sensitivity of the peak III–V component to recent MeHg exposure.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2003.10.059
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34787242
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